Bibliography of the Pre-Papal Writings of Benedict XVI

AN ENGLISH-LANGUAGE BIBLIOGRAPHY
OF THE PRE-PAPAL WRITINGS OF BENEDICT XVI

BOOKS

Ratzinger, Joseph Cardinal. Behold the Pierced One. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1987.
_____. Called to Communion. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1996.
_____. Church, Ecumenism, Politics: New Essays in Ecclesiology. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., 1988.
_____. Co-Workers of the Truth. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1992.
_____. Dogma and Preaching. Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1985.
_____. Eschatology, Death, and Eternal Life. Catholic University of America Press, 1988.
_____. The Feast of Faith. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1986.
_____. God and the World. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2002.
_____. God is Near Us: The Eucharist, the Heart of Life. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2003.
_____. The God of Jesus Christ. Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1979.
_____. Gospel, Catechesis, Catechism. Sidelights on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1997.
_____. In the Beginning… A Catholic Understanding of the Story of Creation and the Fall.Our Sunday Visitor, 1990.
_____. Introduction to Christianity. New York: Seabury Press, 1969.
_____. Introduction to Christianity. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1990.
_____. Introduction to Christianity. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1994.
_____. Journey Towards Easter. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., 1987.
_____. Many Religions – One Covenant: Israel, the Church, and the World. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1999.
_____. Mary: God’s Yes to Man. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1988.
_____. Meaning of Christian Brotherhood. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1993.
_____. Milestones. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1998.
_____. Ministers of Your Joy: Scriptural Meditation of Priestly Spirituality. Servant Publications, 1989.
_____. transl. Walker, Adrian. The Nature and Mission of Theology: Approaches to Understanding Its Role in the Light of Present Controversy. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1995.
_____. A New Song for the Lord: Faith in Christ and Liturgy Today. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co, 1997.
_____. The Open Circle: The Meaning of Christian Brotherhood. Sheed & Ward, 1966.
_____. Principles of Catholic Theology: Building Stones for a Fundamental Theology. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1987.
_____. Principles of Christian Morality. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1986.
_____. The Ratzinger Report. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1985.
_____. Salt of the Earth. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1997.
_____. Seeking God’s Faith. Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1982.
_____. The Spirit of the Liturgy. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2000.
_____. Theological Highlights of Vatican II. Paulist Press, 1966.
_____. Theology of History in St. Bonaventure. Chicago: Franciscan Herald Press, 1989.
_____. To Look on Christ: Exercises in Faith, Hope, and Love. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., 1991.
_____. Truth and Tolerance. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2004.

ARTICLES

Ratzinger, Joseph Cardinal. Against the Power Intellectuals, in 30 Days, March 1991, pp. 68-71.
_____. Announcements and Prefatory Notes of Explanation, in Lumen Gentium inCommentary on the Documents of Vatican II. Herbert Vorgrimler, ed., Vol. 1, New York: Herder and Herder, 1976.
_____. Be Strong, in Catholic World Report, July 1992, pp. 26-29.
_____. The Bishop as Teacher of the Faith, in Origins, Vol. 18, pp. 681-682.
_____. The Case for Religion, in 30 Days, May 1990, pp. 46-51.
_____. Catholic Conscience Foundation and Formation, in Trust the Truth: Symposium on the 20th Anniversary of the Encyclical of Humanae Vitae, Braintree, MA: Pope John XXIII Medical-Moral Research and Education Center, 1991.
_____. The Catechism of the Catholic Church and the Optimism of the Redeemed, inCommunio, Vol. 22, No. 31, January 1993, pp. 529-532.
_____. The Catechism of the Catholic Church in Context, in Reflections on the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Chicago: Midwest Theological Forum, 1993.
_____. Christocentric Preaching, in The Word Toward a Theology of the Word. New York: J.P. Kenedy & Sons, 1961.
_____. The Church and the Theologians, in Origins, Vol. 15, No. 47, May 1986, pp. 761-770.
_____. Concerning the Notion of Person in Theology, in Communio, Vol. 17, Fall 1990, pp. 439-454.
_____. Conscience and Truth, in Trust the Truth: Symposium on the 20th Anniversary of the Encyclical of Humanae Vitae, Braintree, MA: Pope John XXIII Medical-Moral Research and Education Center, 1991.
_____. Dialog with Cardinal Ratzinger, in postscript of Trust the Truth: Symposium on the 20th Anniversary of the Encyclical of Humanae Vitae, Braintree, MA: Pope John XXIII Medical-Moral Research and Education Center, 1991.
_____. The Dogmatic and Ascetical Meaning of Christian Brotherhood, in Man Before God Toward a Theology of Man. New York: J.P. Kenedy & Sons, 1966.
_____. The Eucharist: Communion and Solidarity, in Inside the Vatican, August/September 2002, pp. 10-17.
_____. Faith, Truth, and Culture: Reflections on the Encyclical Fides et Ratio in Traces, Madrid, February 2000.
_____. Gaudium et Spes (Part I, Chapter I), in Commentary on the Documents of Vatican II. Herbert Vorgrimler, ed., Vol. 5, New York: Herder and Herder, 1976.
_____. The Gospel and the Cathechism, in 30 Days, No. 2, 1994, pp. 35-46.
_____. The Heart of the Matter, in 30 Days, October 1989, pp. 46-50.
_____. I Never Said There are Too Many, in 30 Days, May 1989, pp. 18-19.
_____. Interpretation, Contemplation, Action: Considerations on the Task of a Catholic Academy, in Communio, Vol. 13, Summer 1986, pp. 139-155.
_____. Liturgy and Church Music, in L’osservatore Romano, March 1986, pp. 6-8.
_____. Origin and Background, in Dei Verbum in Commentary on the Documents of Vatican II. Herbert Vorgrimler, ed., Vol. 3, New York: Herder and Herder, 1976.
_____. Preface, in Dei Verbum (Chapters 1, 2, and 6) in Commentary on the Documents of Vatican II. Herbert Vorgrimler, ed., Vol. 3, New York: Herder and Herder, 1976.
_____. Reform from the Beginnings, in 30 Days, November 1990, pp. 62-69.
_____. Relativism: The Central Problem for Faith Today, in Origins, Vol. 26, No. 20, October 1996, pp. 309-316.
_____. Some Perspectives on Priestly Formation Today, in 30 Days, February 1990, pp. 46-53.
_____. The Sources and Transmission of the Faith, in Communio, Vol. X, No. 1, Spring 1983, pp. 17-34.
_____. Sources of Moral Theology: Closing Address, in The Priest, September 1984, pp. 19-30.
_____. Sources of Moral Theology: Keynote Address, in The Priest, September 1984, pp. 10-18.
_____. Starting from Nothing, in 30 Days, December 1990, pp. 55-58.
_____. Theological Questions on the Origin of Life, in Trust the Truth: Symposium on the 20th Anniversary of the Encyclical of Humanae Vitae, Braintree, MA: Pope John XXIII Medical-Moral Research and Education Center, 1991.
_____. Thorn in the Flesh, in Catholic World Report, November 1992, pp. 48-54.
_____. Three Theses of the Vision of Man, in Press Conference for the Publication of Evangelium Vitae in L’osservatore Romano, March 1995.
_____. Truth and Freedom, in Communio, Vol. 23, Spring 1996, pp. 16-35.
_____. We Experienced That There God Dwells With Men, in Inside the Vatican, January 1998, pp. 43-47.
_____. You Are Full of Grace: Elements of Biblical Devotion to Mary, in Communio, Vol.XVI, 1989, pp. 54-68.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Balthasar, Ratzinger, Kasper et al. The Church and Women: A Compendium. Helmut Moll, ed., San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1998.
Nichols, Aidan, O.P. The Theology of Joseph Ratzinger. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1988.
Rahner, Ratzinger, et al. The Espiscopate and the Primacy. (Quaest. Disput. 4) New York: Herder and Herder, 1961.
Rahner, Ratzinger, et al. Revelation and Tradition. (Quaest. Disput. 17) New York: Herder and Herder, 1966.
Ratzinger, Joseph Cardinal. The Interview. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2003.
Ratzinger, Joseph & Schönborn, Christoph. Introduction to the Catechism of the Catholic Church. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1994.

Joseph Ratzinger, Cardinal

The biography of Joseph Ratzinger, the future Pope Benedict XVI, begins, of course, with his birth in Bavaria, Germany, on April 16, 1927, Holy Saturday, and baptized the very same day, in the newly blessed Easter water. This special baptism was seen from the beginning of his life as a very special blessing of Divine Providence.

Though he and the Ratzinger family saw Naziism as the spirit of Anti-Christ, Joseph was forced into the German army near the end of World War II. He escaped, surrendered to the US forces, and spent a few months in a POW camp. Upon his release, he and his brother Georg entered the seminary and were ordained priests together on June 29, 1951. After receiving his doctorate in theology from the University of Munich in 1953, Fr. Joseph Ratzinger became a professor of dogmatic theology at the University of Bonn. When Vatican Council II began in 1962, Fr. Ratzinger, only 35 years old at the time, was named chief “peritus” or theological advisor to the Archbishop of Cologne, Joseph Cardinal Frings and accompanied him to all four sessions of the council, having input on the writing of several of the Council Documents. From 1969 until 1977 Fr. Ratzinger taught theology at the University of Regensburg and, from 1969 until 1980, he was a member of the Vatican’s International Theological Commission. In 1972, together with French theologian Henri de Lubac and the Swiss priest Hans Urs von Balthasar, Ratzinger founded the theological journal Communion which now has editions in 14 countries. It is notable that the Polish edition of Communio was brought about by the archbishop of Krakow, Karol Wojtyla.

Fr. Joseph Ratzinger was ordained archbishop of Munich-Freising on May 28, 1977 and was created a cardinal priest by Pope Paul VI on June 27, 1977, his titular church in Rome being St. Mary of Consolation (in Tiburtina).

On April 5, 1993 Cardinal Ratzinger was transferred by Pope John Paul II to the order of cardinal bishops as titular bishop of the suburbicarian see of Velletri-Signi. In 1981 Cardinal Ratzinger became the Prefect (head) of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Vatican department in charge of protecting the sacred deposit of the faith handed on from the apostles. As such, he was Pope John Paul II’s chief assistant in the formulation of the Pope’s teaching and writing. There is perhaps no one who worked more closely with Pope John Paul II during the course of his pontificate. Cardinal Ratzinger would generally have lengthy private meetings with the Pope twice per week. Before his election as Pope Benedict XVI, Cardinal Ratzinger also served president of the Pontifical Biblical and Theological Commissions.

On November 6, 1998, Cardinal Ratzinger was appointed Vice-dean of the Sacred College of Cardinals. Prior to the death of Pope John Paul II, he served as a member of the Congregation of Bishops, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, the Congregation for Catholic Education, the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, the Congregation for the Oriental Churches, the Council for Christian Unity, the Council for Culture, the Commission Ecclesia Dei, and the Commission for Latin America. As prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Cardinal Ratzinger had a decisive role in the writing of the “Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification,” signed in October 1999 by the Holy See and the World Lutheran Federation in Augsburg, Germany. The declaration, one of the most important ecumenical steps since Martin Luther’s split with the Catholic Church in the 16th century, took place thanks to the dialogue held in November 1998 between Cardinal Ratzinger and Lutheran Bishop Johannes Hanselman in Munich.

As he approached his mid-seventies, Cardinal Ratzinger attempted to retire several times, but Pope John Paul II would not accept his resignation.

It seems Pope John Paul II knew God had other plans for the German Cardinal. At 78, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was elected as Pope Benedict XVI on April 19, 2005, only the second day of the conclave. This speedy election demonstrates a remarkable consensus on the part of the 115 Cardinals who elected him by a two-thirds majority. Their vote was for a defender of the truth, a man of prayer, a humble servant of the servants of God.

 

Besides his academic articles and official Church documents, the new Pope Benedict XVI provides us with a window into his mind and heart through several books, the Ratzinger Report (1996), The Spirit of the Liturgy (2000), God and the World (2002) and Introduction to Christianity. Joseph Ratzinger is the oldest cardinal to be named pope since Clement XII, who was also 78 when he became pope in 1730. He is the first German pope since Victor II (1055-1057).